Courses for Credit & Audit

Earn college credits or just learn more about a subject that interests you during Antioch College’s summer and mid-winter block terms. Courses are open to high school juniors and seniors, students enrolled at other colleges and universities, and the general public. Courses may be audited or taken for college credit. Special topic courses are offered both by the College’s faculty and by visiting faculty who are experts in the field. 

Winter 2020 Session Special Courses

January 6 — March 20, 2020

Arts

ARTS 111 Visual Language: Two-Dimensional Design

Tuesdays & Thursdays 9:00 AM – 11:50 AM  | Arts & Science Building 101 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit
Material Fees: $80

Instructor Forest Bright

This studio course is an introduction to the basic techniques, concepts and formal strategies involved in two-dimensional image making. We will investigate fundamentals of composition and form such as line, value, movement, and color. These fundamentals will allow us to further explore representation and abstraction, surface and depth. Throughout this class, form is primarily considered a means for content and communication. Projects in this class will be realized with tools both manual (e.g. pencils, charcoal, inks, and paper) and digital (e.g. PhotoShop and Illustrator). Digital techniques will include the basics of pixel and vector-based graphics programs, as well as the design potential of text, including typeface form and font choice.

MEDA 102 Basic Media Production

Tuesdays & Thursdays 6:30 PM – 9:20 PM | Arts & Science Building 218 & 219 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit
Material Fees: $80

Instructor Catalina Jordan Alvarez

This course covers the media production skills necessary to realize independent video projects. Students will learn the essentials of camerawork for moving images, color correction, video editing, cinematic language, sound recording and mixing. The theme of this year’s course is “Action Now!” Students choose an area of activism and make work with that end in mind, sharing it on the internet and at unlikely venues, in order to reach audiences who may not otherwise see it. For their final project, students screen their project(s) in a public forum of their own design, likely in collaboration with another group or organization.

PERF 140 Storytelling

Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM | Foundry Theater 103 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Louise Smith

What is your story? Story is often the centerpiece of performance and for many contemporary performance artists writing is essential to their practice. Students will begin with a study of selected folklore-based myths, folktales, fairy tales, and legends to learn how different types of stories and the context of their presentation shape peoples’ identities and worldviews. A variety of critical examinations of contemporary performance texts and contexts including the personal experience narrative, testimonies, journalism, and other media will be explored. Field trips to contemporary storytelling events will also be included. Students will present a public storytelling event as a culmination of their work in the class.

VISA 250 The Object in Space

Mondays & Wednesdays 2:30 PM – 5:20 PM  | Arts & Science Building 119 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit
Material Fees: $80

Instructor Michael Casselli

Building upon the 3D visual literacy we developed in our foundation course, this course will continue an investigation of materials, methods, and concepts of 3 dimensional work. We will investigate the formal properties and expressive potential of our chosen materials and expand this investigation to explore space, context and site. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship of material to concept or meaning, the processes or methods used in making dimensional work, and the way in which objects exist in particular environments/contexts. This studio class will include significant studio time, slide presentations, demonstrations of technical methods, one-on-one and group discussions, field trips and critiques of your work.

VISA 265 Art History/ Art Stories

Mondays & Wednesdays 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM | Arts & Science Building 119 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Michael Casselli

We will examine the histories, theories, critical foundations, and stories of modernist art, the historical avant-garde, and their relationship to contemporary artistic modalities. We will also consider contemporary art and the relationship to the historical avant-garde movements on which it builds, incorporating narratives and artworks that are produced though often times excluded from the critical dialogue. Seminar style coursework will include, classroom discussion, selected readings, field trips, creative and/or writing projects.

Humanities

HIST 226 World History II, from 1500 to the Present

Mondays & Wednesdays 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM | McGregor 130 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Raul Nair

This course will present students with an understanding of the changes experienced by peoples in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas as the interaction between these peoples increased as a result of exploration, trade, and conquest. Topics to be covered will include the global impact of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the establishment of colonies by European nations, the growth and expansion of militarism, the development of foreign policies to manage the interaction between nations, the decolonization movement, and the growth of the global economy.

HIST 234 Native American History

Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM | McGregor 118 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Kevin McGruder

Native American History will consider the development of people who over thousands of years established cultures in North Americas that ranged from nomadic groups to people living in cities of over 100,000 people. Students will learn the various ways that European contact affected Native Americans, particularly the continuing struggle over territory after Europeans made contact with them. The various ways that Native American people sought ways to survive and in some cases thrive will be explored.

LIT 230 Introduction to a Form: Poetry of Resistance and Witness

Mondays & Wednesdays 4:30 PM – 6:20 PM | McGregor 118 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Mary Ann Davis

Our introduction to poetry will circle an enduring debate: what is the (social, historical, political, personal) purpose of poetry and what then is the responsibility of poets in creating their lineated lyrics? To explore the intersections between poetry and social change, as well as to introduce ourselves to the formal possibilities of poetry, we will focus on poets writing in the tradition of witness or resistance. Our readings will range across global conflict zones and histories of enslavement and genocide; we will also give considerable attention to lyrical poetry that addresses oppressions of difference in the United States. Lyric poetry is defined by its investigations into the nature of personal voice, of this “I” who speaks. As we consider poems of witness and resistance in the lyric mode, a number of questions arise: How does a solitary speaker correspond to society at large? What aspects of an individual’s identity (race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, religion, subculture) get to speak in a poem and what aspects get heard? How can the personal or confessional contribute to a social or political purpose? Most importantly, how does the form of the poem (line, rhyme, meter, tone, image, metaphor, etc.) contribute to its protest, witness, opposition, or resistance?

PHIL 110 Law and Justice in the Western Tradition

Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM | McGregor 149 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Lew Trelawny-Cassity

This is an introductory course designed to explore the themes of law and justice as they have been addressed in the philosophical tradition, in contemporary political debates, and in legal opinions. Students will become familiar with these topics through readings in classical, modern, and contemporary works of philosophy as well as Supreme Court cases. At the end of this course, students are expected to have attained familiarity with some of the most important thinkers in the western tradition (such as Plato, Aquinas, James Madison, Mill, Emma Goldman, Martin Luther King, and Rawls) and to have developed the ability to articulate their views on contemporary political, moral, and legal questions.

PHIL 230 Special Topics in Philosophy: Philosophy as a Way of Life

Mondays & Wednesdays 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM | McGregor 149 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Lew Trelawny-Cassity

In this course we will explore the ancient view that philosophy is primarily a mode of life as opposed to a collection of claims, propositions, or concepts. This class will survey Cynicism, Stoicism, Epicureanism, Daoism, as well as authors and topics suggested by students. In exploring philosophy as a way of life, this class will examine the relationship between philosophy and politics and the relationship between theory and practice.

Science

ENVS 205 Ecology

Mondays & Wednesdays 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM | Arts & Science Building 115 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Kim Landsbergen

This course will cover the basic principles of ecology using an evolutionary perspective. The activities of organisms and their relationships to one another are the foundation upon which populations, communities, and ecosystems are built. Students will examine factors that influence exchanges between organisms and their physical environment; how organisms transform energy and process materials as they metabolize, grow, and reproduce; the characteristics of populations and how they interact within communities; and the dynamics of ecosystems. There is a lab requirement.

Social Science

ANTH 305 Anthropology of Space and Place

Fridays 9:00 AM – 12:50 PM | Meets Off Campus | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Jennifer Grubbs

The spaces we occupy, from our towns, homes, schools, and communities we live, work, and play in are more than physical backdrops for human activity. These spaces are material manifestations of aspiration and cultural values that co-construct and shape the imagination and capacities of the people that inhabit and traverse them. This course will explore foundational theories of space and place in anthropology as well as ethnographic case studies of the intersections of cities, gentrification, race, class, gender, immigration, and the environment. This course engages ethnographic, politically engaged, and historical readings on space and place in conversation in order to provide a basis for understanding how and when human beings, societies, nature, and social spaces are co-produced. The course opens with an exploration of fundamental concepts in the anthropology of space before moving into specific interrogations of concepts like nature, cities, race, gender, precarity, and scarcity. This course will meet inside of Dayton Correctional Institution. Students must receive instructor permission to register for the class, as well as arrange transportation and receive Security clearance by the Ohio department of rehabilitation and corrections.

PECO 280 Capitalism I: Globalization and Development

Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM | McGregor 126 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Dean Snyder

Why are some countries rich and others poor? What accounts for the highly uneven nature of global economic development? This course
provides an overview of the political economy of development, with a specific focus on the era of globalization. The course begins by
examining the nature of capitalism as a mode of production and the origins of the modern world economy in the era of colonialism and
European industrialization. Then, we turn our attention to the capitalist development models employed in the 1950s through the 1970s.
Although we will analyze the central role of the United States in setting the institutional framework for postwar international development,
our primary focus will be on the nations of the Third World. The majority of our course will be focus on the transformation of the postwar
international economic framework and the rise of neoliberal globalization (1980s – present) – a development paradigm that has been
linked to rising economic inequality and ecological crises in both the Global North and Global South. This course’s signature assignment
includes examining the effects of globalization in countries where Antioch students have opportunities for international co-op placements.
Prerequisite: None.

PECO 390 Special Topics in Political Economy: Community-Based Research

Mondays & Wednesdays 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM | McGregor 118 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Téofilo Espada & Sean Payne

Community-based research is a model of engaged scholarship through which community members and researchers collaborate to solve problems and facilitate social action. This course seeks to integrate the knowledge and skills students have acquired in courses at Antioch and apply the theories they have learned through community-based research. Students will design and conduct a research project to collect data on issues that are relevant to our community and propose programs, policies, or modifications of existing practices. By the end of the quarter, students should have identified the needs and strengths of our community and how to make informed recommendations to institutions and communities.

PSYC 105 General Psychology

Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM | McGregor 118 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Téofilo Espada

The field of psychology explores the interdependent experiences of thinking, feeling and acting and how these underlying dynamics affect the quality of one’s psychological life. Psychology encompasses a wide number of therapeutic theories and approaches and each is characterized by its unique set of variables employed to explain behavior. It is the objective of this course to acquaint students with different theoretical frameworks, their particular methodologies and expectations for the psychology major

PSYC 395 Special Topics in Psychology: Community-Based Research

Mondays & Wednesdays 8:30 AM – 10:20 AM | McGregor 118 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Téofilo Espada & Sean Payne

Community-based research is a model of engaged scholarship through which community members and researchers collaborate to solve problems and facilitate social action. This course seeks to integrate the knowledge and skills students have acquired in courses at Antioch and apply the theories they have learned through community-based research. Students will design and conduct a research project to collect data on issues that are relevant to our community and propose programs, policies, or modifications of existing practices. By the end of the quarter, students should have identified the needs and strengths of our community and how to make informed recommendations to institutions and communities.

Language & Culture

FRAN 102 Novice French Culture and Communication II

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Thursdays 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM | Arts & Science Building 202 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Cary Campbell

FRAN 102 uses a communicative approach to integrate cultural products, practices, and perspectives into developing the four skills of communication in French (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with a focus on real-time interpersonal oral production of simple, but full and increasingly complex present tense phrases and sentence structures in a variety of familiar contexts and uncomplicated social interactions. This course roughly targets the ACTFL Intermediate-Low rating. Teaching methodologies may include task-based, project based, and other experiential learning assignments. Offered every Winter term. Taught in French.

FRAN 303 Contemporary French and Francophone Culture in Media

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Thursdays 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM | Arts & Science Building 202 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructor Cary Campbell

For students with years of previous study in French as demonstrated by a placement protocol or with a passing grade in FRAN 202, FRAN 303 uses a content-based approach to investigate French and Francophone cultural practices, and perspectives through press articles, film, music, and popular art forms on a variety of topics including but not limited to politics, ideology, family, religion, love, feminism, language, race, ethnicity, gender. The course envisions a cross-cultural study of contemporary topics of interest to the students, and promotes a democratic pedagogy. Using the course’s content as the subject of academic inquiry, it also develops the four skills of communication in French (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with a focus on real-time interpersonal and presentational oral production of cohesive paragraphs featuring narration and description in all tenses and on a variety of increasingly abstract and academic contexts, as well as on interpretive communication and argumentation through expository process writing. This course roughly targets the ACTFL Advanced-Mid rating. Teaching methodologies may include task-based, project-based, and other experiential learning assignments. Offered every other winter term. Taught in French.

SPAN 102 Novice Spanish Culture and Communication II

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 12:30 PM – 1:20 PM | McGregor 130 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Dieder Franco

SPAN 102 uses a communicative approach to integrate cultural products, practices, and perspectives into developing the four skills of communication in Spanish (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with a focus on real-time interpersonal oral production of simple, but full and increasingly complex present tense phrases and sentence structures in a variety of familiar contexts and uncomplicated social interactions. This course roughly targets the ACTFL Intermediate-Low rating. Teaching methodologies may include task-based, projectbased, and other experiential learning assignments. Offered every Winter term. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 303 Hispanophone Cultural Diversity

Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM | McGregor 130 | 4 Credits available

Tuition: $300 to audit | $2,000 for college credit

Instructors Dieder Franco

For students with years of previous study in Spanish as demonstrated by a placement exam or for students with a passing grade in SPAN 202, this course is designed to provide intensive practice in conversation, reading and writing in the Spanish language. Content of this course explores the richness and complexity of cultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world.  This course also incorporates exploration of the vast dialects and cultural expressions spoken in Latin America and Spain. Using the course’s content as the subject of academic inquiry, it also develops the four skills of communication in Spanish (reading, writing, speaking, and listening), with a Special focus will be given to real-time interpersonal and presentational oral production of cohesive paragraphs featuring narration and description in all tenses and on a variety of increasingly abstract and academic contexts.  This course roughly targets the ACTFL Advanced-Mid rating. Teaching methodologies may include task-based, project-based, and other experiential learning assignments. Offered every other winter term. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, placement, or special instructor permission. Satisfies Diversity Requirement (D-CRES) due to extensive theory and practice in cross-cultural comparison. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202, placement, or instructor permission.

Registration

To enroll, please apply for admission as a non-degree-seeking student. View full instructions here under the “Non-Degree-Seeking” tab.

 

To enroll, please apply for admission as a non-degree-seeking student.