Humanities Faculty

Brooke Bryan wearing black with necklace, outdoor background

Brooke Bryan

Chair of the Writing Program and Assistant Professor of Writing and Digital Literacy

Brooke Bryan wearing black with necklace, outdoor background
Brooke Bryan

 

Brooke Bryan is Chair of the Writing Program and Assistant Professor of Writing and Digital Literacy at Antioch College where she specializes in phenomenological oral history and undergraduate research frameworks.

Supported by the Great Lakes Colleges Association, Brooke directs Oral History in the Liberal Arts—a three-year initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that supports undergraduate oral history research by providing open source workflows and technology stacks for tools in the digital humanities, and articulating pedagogical strategies for ‘high stakes’ teaching and learning through faculty-mentored oral history projects across 13 institutions.

 

EDUCATION

  • M.A., Oral History Methodology, Antioch University, 2013
  • B.A., Classics, Antioch University, 2009

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

  • Supported by GLCA, led a team of scholars and librarians exploring undergraduate research paradigms at ILiADS at Hamilton College's Digital Humanities Initiative; included funding for one student who was able to present on a panel, becoming a founding member of the Undergraduate Research Network
  • Instructor at Ohio Humanities' residential Oral History Institute at Kenyon College
  • Supported by the Lloyd Family Fund at Antioch College, coached four students to present posters of their faculty-mentored research projects (conducted during WORK 425) exploring social justice themes at the 2015 Oral History Association meeting in Tampa Bay.
  • Led a workshop on digital tools for research at Oral History Association annual meeting, "Digging into Digital Platforms: One Interview/Four Tools"
  • Served on the Grant Review panel for the Ohio History Fund, awarding $100,000 to 14 projects across the state
  • Commissioned as an interviewer for Ohio History's Ohio Veterans Oral History project with the support of Ohio Humanities
  • Awarded $393,710 grant from the Great Lakes Colleges Association through the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The three-year project, Oral History in the Liberal Arts, connects oral history and digital storytelling methods with experiential learning and undergraduate research paradigms-- developing a consortial archive and providing pedagogical tutorials and open source technology stacks to faculty and librarians across all 13 GLCA schools. The project is designed to provide micro-grants to more than 50 faculty, instructional staff, and students across GLCA over three years.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Mary Ann Davis wearing blue, holding book

Mary Ann Davis

Assistant Professor of Literature

Mary Ann Davis wearing blue, holding book
Mary Ann Davis

Mary Ann Davis (pronouns she/her) is a poet, lyrical theorist, and scholar with varied interests across the disciplines of literary, feminist, sexuality, and queer studies. She earned an M.F.A. in Poetry from the University of Michigan – where she was awarded a prestigious Hopwood Award – before completing a Ph.D. in Literature and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California.

Her scholarship explores literary, cultural, and theoretical engagements with erotic power in Great Britain and the United States from the mid-nineteenth century through the present, especially in the forms of sadomasochism, kink, and BDSM. Her monograph in-progress, Between the Monstrous and the Mundane, is a hybrid work of lyric theory. Offering a genealogy of sadomasochism that moves beyond stereotypes of extremity, focusing rather on the banal and the everyday, this project engages a range of texts: literature and art (Charlotte Brontë, Swinburne, Sacher-Masoch, Rice, Flanagan and Rose); culture and subculture (50 Shades, Samois, Society of Janus, BDSM handbooks); and theorists and practitioners (Deleuze, Foucault, MacKendrick, Rubin, Barthes, contemporary BDSM players), alongside the author’s reflections on her experiences in queer BDSM and leather subcultures.

Mary Ann’s poems have appeared in In Posse Review and Crab Orchard Review, and won the 2011 Prism Review Poetry Prize and the 2016 Robin Becker Chapbook competition for Portrait of a Voice. An essay published in OCHO: A Journal of Queer Arts explores her interest in bridging the divide between critical and lyrical thinking, especially as a process of healing. A poetry manuscript in-progress, Sublunary, returns to metaphysical questions and forms to sing through queer erotic intimacy and growing up queer.

Born and raised in Louisville, Kentucky, she also considers herself to be a Californian at heart. When not teaching or writing, she is reading long fantasy novels, practicing kundalini yoga, traveling in search of sublime crema (espresso), building queer and kink community, and ruminating on erotic ethics.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D. in English Literature and Gender Studies, University of Southern California, 2012
  • M.F.A. in Poetry Writing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 2003
  • B.A. in English and Creative Writing, Denison University, 2000

COURSES

  • Literature 130, Literature and Social Justice: LGBTQ Lives
  • Literature 246, The Harlem Renaissance
  • Literature 250, Intermediate Creative Writing: Lyric Poetry and Lyric Essays
  • Literature 331, Literary Moments and Movements after 1850: Literature Under Totalitarianism
  • Literature 325, Literature and Power: Women Write the Erotic
  • Literature 350, Advanced Creative Writing: Serial Poems and Story Cycles
  • Literature 370, Special Topics: Queer Reading
  • Humanities 494, Senior Seminar in the Humanities
  • Humanities 495, Senior Project in the Humanities

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

 

In-Process

  • Between the Monstrous and the Mundane. Hybrid work of lyric theory.
  • Sublunary: Poems. Full-length poetry manuscript.

Articles/Essays

  • “Oatmeal and Shit: Some Notes on Mundanity” Rated RX: Sheree Rose with and after Bob Flanagan. Ed. Yetta Howard. Under contract with Ohio State University Press. Forthcoming in 2020
  • “‘On the Extreme Brink’ with Charlotte Brontë: Revisiting Jane Eyre’s Erotics of Power.” Papers on Language and Literature 52.2 (Spring 2016): 115-148. Print.
  • “A Certain Simultaneity: On Lyricism, Criticism, and Healing Divides Between and Within.” OCHO: A Journal of Queer Arts. Issue 33 (Sept. 2014): 78-82. Print.
  • “‘New Elemental Force’: The Necessity of an Engaged Poetry.” Denison Journal of Religion. Volume I (2001). Print.

Poems

AWARDS

  • 2018 : Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Ed., Faculty Excellence Award for Service
  • 2018: Martin Luther King, Jr. Drum Major Award for Faculty, Coretta Scott King Center, Antioch College
  • 2017: Research Award, Antioch College Faculty Fund, Antioch College
  • 2016: Winner of Robin Becker Poetry series, Seven Kitchens Press
  • 2015: LGBTQ Faculty Award for Leadership and Mentoring, The Claremont Colleges
Kevin McGruder blue sweater, outdoor background

Kevin McGruder

Vice President of Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of History

Kevin McGruder blue sweater, outdoor background
Kevin McGruder

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Kevin McGruder’s interest in community formation led to a career in community development, and now as an academic, to research interests that include African American institutions, urban history, and gay and lesbian history. He has a B.A. in Economics from Harvard University and an M.B.A. in Real Estate Finance from Columbia University. Before pursuing doctoral studies at City University of New York, McGruder worked for many years in the field of nonprofit community development. Positions included Program Director at Local Initiatives Support Corporation, Director of Real Estate Development with the Abyssinian Development Corporation, and Executive Director of Gay Men of African Descent (in New York City).

McGruder’s interest in Harlem’s history led to two entrepreneurial ventures. From 1990 to 1991 he was owner/manager of Home to Harlem gift shop, and from 2000 to 2008 he was co-owner of Harlemade Style Shop, a store providing Harlem-themed tee shirts, books and other items celebrating Harlem.

During the 2011-2012 academic year McGruder was a Scholar in Residence at the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, of the New York Public Library, where he conducted additional research and revised his doctoral dissertation for publication as a book. The result is Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem, 1890-1920 (Columbia University Press, June 2015).

 

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., History, City University of New York, Graduate Center
  • M.B.A., Real Estate Finance, Columbia University
  • B.A., Economics, Harvard University

COURSES

  • CLCN 210: Community Engagement
  • HIST 210: African American History from the Colonial Period to the Present
  • HIST 331: The History of the American City

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • The Emancipation Proclamation: Forever Free (Urban Ministries, Inc., 2013).
  • Witness: Two Hundred Years of African-American Faith and Practice in the Abyssinian Baptist Church of Harlem (W.B. Eerdmans, 2013)
  • Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem, 1890-1920 (Columbia University Press, 2015)
  • “A Fair and Open Field: The Responses of Black New Yorkers to the New York City Draft Riots”, Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, July, 2013
  • “Pathologizing Sexuality: The U.S. Experience,” in Black Sexualities: Powers, Passions, Practices, and Policies, edited by Sandra L. Barnes and Juan Battle, Rutgers University Press, 2010
  • “Black Sexuality in the U.S.: Presentations as Non-normative,” Journal of African American Studies, Vol. 13, No. 3 (2009)
  • “To Be Heard in Print: Black Gay Writers in 1980s New York,” Obsidian III: Literature in the African Diaspora, Spring/Summer 2005, Volume 6, Number 1 (North Carolina State University)
  • “Jane Ryder Fisher” The Black Scholar, Spring/Summer 1993

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Lara Mitias

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Lara Mitias

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Lara Marie Mitias currently serves as an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Antioch College where she teaches Asian philosophies, along with various courses in Western Philosophy.  She completed her doctorate at the University of Hawaii specializing in Asian and Comparative philosophy. She has taught over 35 different courses in Western and non-Western philosophy, including Logic, Metaphysics, Social and Political Philosophy, Philosophy for Children (P4C) and courses on Death, along with many independent study courses, including On Happiness, and Indian Philosophy of Language.  She has two published articles, “Desiring the Past,” and “P4C: Process, Perspective, and Pluralism for Children.”

Education

Ph.D., Philosophy, University of Hawai’i
M.A., Philosophy, Ohio University
B.A., Philosophy, Ohio University

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Favorite Courses

Existentialism

In this class we will study the writings of the some of the most interesting and influential philosophers of the 19th and 20th century, including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Sartre.  These philosophers bring our attention back to fundamental aspects of our own existence and experience and so have been classified together as 'existentialist'.  Existentialist philosophers don’t offer us a philosophical movement, or any set of philosophical claims, or even methods. These philosophers aimed to lead us to our own point of view by giving us access to their singular points of view.  They bring our attention to essential aspects of being an existing individual, and as both subject and object. Turning our focus back to the experience of being 'the existing individual', and recognizing the reality or 'truth' of our own subjectivity, has been a significant movement in the history of philosophy. This revival of the real (experiencing) subject has been pivotal for philosophical and social and political developments in the 20-21st century. 

Indian and Buddhist Philosophy

This course is an introduction to Indian philosophical traditions including Buddhism.  

We begin with the Vedas and Upanisads, at the beginning of written history and with some of the earliest writing we have.  In these ancient Sanskrit texts we find the seeds of a complex and analytical philosophical tradition, giving rise to a detailed development through theoretical debate with opposing schools lasting over a millennia.  

From these early profound expressions of Indian philosophy, we turn to the seminal text of Indian culture and thought, the Bhagavad Gita, or Song of God.  We will explore the ethics of the Gita with the study of Yoga philosophy, including parts of the Yoga Sutras, and will discuss the pervasion of the philosophy of yoga in the Indian philosophical and religious traditions, as well as its appropriation of this tradition and these ideas in the West.   This text has been said to give the distillation of Indian philosophy offering its essence. In this text we also find the presentation of the views of two central strains of Indian philosophical thought: Advaita-Vedanta and Samkhya-Yoga. We will read from these schools most significant and most expressive texts, as well as secondary sources clarifying these philosophies. 

After establishing this background in Classical Indian philosophies we will turn to Buddhist Philosophical developments.  The Buddha lived relatively early in the development of Indian philosophies and the schools developed in argument with one another.  In this enduring conversation, Buddhism is often involved and its traditions often hold views antithetical to central views held in common by other schools, and we will explore these important differences.  We will also look at what is shared in these Indian traditions and its significance and in relation to more familiar Western philosophical ideas. There are also many divergences among and between these traditions on many issues and ideas.  We will read excerpts from the Theravada and Mahayana traditions, including the words of Buddha and important Buddhist texts. We will end with a short introduction to the development Chan Buddhism in China and then Zen in Japan.

Philosophy for Children (P4C) 

P4C stands for ‘Philosophy for Children,’ and is an innovative international pedagogical movement meant to foster inquiry and critical thinking skills in a shared community.  

When we do philosophy with children (P4C), we don’t teach philosophy.  Instead, we facilitate group discussion among students.  P4C is most often at the elementary level, but can be done with any grade or group and the methods of P4C and their practice are useful far beyond the classroom.

With the Philosophers Toolkit for understanding one another in hand, and the rules and practices of doing P4C in shared community, together we discuss issues concerning the students and explore ideas that they are interested in.  Through the practices of inquiry and critical thinking skills, students consider their own thinking and that of others on interesting and important questions. These may be questions that we often don't take time to explore. “Why does someone become homeless and why do we treat them badly?” a fearless group of students in Hawaii asked after one of them had thrown stones at a man living on a beach the day before. Children have innumerable ideas and questions; things they think and wonder about and want to talk about, and practicing P4C in the classroom gives us the opportunity. 

The idea of P4C, and the P4C program was created by Matthew Lipman at Montclair State University but the ideals of P4C, and the importance of developing the thinking skills and practice of community inquiry can be traced to John Dewey and the requirements for genuinely democratic societies.  And P4C has been called ‘philosophy for everyone,’ and its use and benefits extend far beyond the classroom. The methods of P4C enable us to engage and discuss critical issues together in a critical and productive way without being critical of others or being criticized by others. These methods of engagement and inquiry and this model of pedagogy are essential to productive dialogue and understanding.  

The experiences we have doing P4C in the classroom are exciting and unique. It is very fun, often enlightening, and always interesting!

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 All Special Topics Courses in Philosophy

(These courses are student-interest driven)

Recent Special Topics: 

  • Philosophy of Time 
  • Phenomenology 
  • Yoga Philosophy: Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras

Recent Independent Studies:

  • Metaphysics

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Recent Papers

De and Yin: Can Daoist philosophy offer us a new feminism?Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy (SACP) Conference, Beijing China 6/2017

“Going without-going: Going without-going: Conclusions on present time from a Nyāya-Buddhist debate,” American Philosophical Association Pacific meeting, March 2017

“Phenomenologies of Place” Philosopher’s Roundtable, Antioch College, October 2016

“The Place of the Body in Nishida Kitaro’s Phenomenology of Place,” Philosopher’s Roundtable, Antioch College, January 2017

“Living Places,” 11th international Philosophers East-West Conference on ‘Place,’ East-West Center, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, May 23-June 12016

“The Conversion of Opposites: Speculative Metaphysis and the Appreciation of Beauty in Whitehead’s Philosophy and Daoist Thought,” Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy (SAAP) 43rd Annual Convention, University of Oregon and Oregon State University, March 3-6 2016

“The Transitivity of External Good-ness and It’s Significance,” response paper to M. Cashen “Aristotle on External Goods: Applying the Politics to the Nichomachean Ethics,” Indiana Philosophical Association (IPA) Conference Response Paper, November 12-14 2015  

Selected Publications

“The Logic of Dao” submitted to Frontiers in Chinese Philosophy (FPC), Brill Publishing, Submitted 6/2016, in third and final review 3/2017.

“The Place of the Body in the Phenomenology of Place: Edward Casey and Nishida Kitaro.” In Place. Edited by Peter D. Hershock and Roger T. Ames. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, forthcoming.

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Rahul Nair wearing blue collar shirt

Rahul Nair

Assistant Professor of History

Rahul Nair wearing blue collar shirt
Rahul Nair

 

Rahul Nair is an Assistant Professor of World History at Antioch College. Previously he has served as an Assistant Professor at Georgia Gwinnett College in Lawrenceville, Georgia (2012-13) and at the University of Denver in Denver, Colorado (2005-12). He received his doctoral degree in History with a specialization on South Asia, from the University of Pennsylvania in 2006, after graduating with an M.A. in Modern Indian History from Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India. His areas of specialization include South Asia, imperialism, and world history. He is currently working on a book titled, The Rise and Decline of India’s Population Problem in the Twentieth Century. He is fluent in Malayalam, French, Bengali, and Hindi.

 

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., History, University of Pennsylvania, 2006
  • M.A., History, Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India, 1998
  • M.A., Economics, University of Delhi in Delhi, India, 1996
  • B.A., Economics, University of Kerala, 1993

COURSES

  • HIST 105: The World Beyond: Cultural Imagination, Exchanges and History In this foundation-level course, students will study how people in various parts of the world imagined what was beyond their everyday experiences, particularly across the oceans, and how these imaginings often motivated them to venture out to make contact with these other worlds for purposes of trade, resettlement, and conquest. The course will use early texts of various cultures, travelogues, diaries, ship captains’ accounts, newspaper articles, and other sources to reveal the voices of the participants in historical events.
  • HIST 226: World History II, from 1500 CE to present This course provides students with an understanding of the changes experienced by peoples in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas as the interaction between these peoples increased as a result of exploration, trade, and conquest. Topics to be covered will include the global impact of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade, the establishment of colonies by European nations, the growth and expansion of militarism, the development of foreign policies to manage the interaction between nations, the decolonization movement, and the growth of the global economy.
  • HIST 334: The History of a Person: Gandhi Gandhi’s iconic status both in India and abroad owes much to his leadership role in the struggle for Indian independence from British rule. His own life was roughly coterminus with the Indian national movement, which in 1947 resulted in the creation of two nations, India and Pakistan. Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence, political morality, and critique of western modernity were developed in the context of and are inextricably linked to the history of the Indian nationalist movement.  In the first part of this course we look at the origins and trace the development of an Indian national movement that was already half a century old when Gandhi came onto the scene. We then examine how under Gandhi’s leadership the nationalist movement becomes a mass movement that culminated in both the tragedy of partition and the triumph of independence.

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Book Manuscript: The Rise and Decline of India’s Population Problem in the Twentieth Century (under contract with Routledge)
  • “The Planning of Birth in the Birth of Planning: Medicalized Birth Control as Population Control in India, 1919-1952,” under review in South Asian History and Culture.
  • The Population Problem in Inter-war India and China, Panel Organizer, 2017 American Historical Association Conference, Denver, 5-8 January 2017.
  • The Planning of Birth and the Birth of Planning: Medicalized Birth Control as Population Control in India, 1919-1952, 2017 American Historical Association Conference, Denver, 6 January 2017.
  • The Pitfalls and Potential of Teaching Gandhi to American Undergraduates, Presenter, Roundtable on Teaching South Asia in the U.S. and the Midwest: Strategies, Challenges Possibilities. 2016,Ohio Academy of History Annual Meeting and Conference, 1-2 April 2016.
  • Sex and the Nation: A Tale of Two American Visitors to India, 2013, International Conference on South Asian Studies, Leiden, 6-7 December 2013.
  • “The Construction of a ‘Population Problem’ in Colonial India 1919-1947,” in Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History (2011), 39:2, 227-47.
Lewis Trelawny-Cassity wearing brown sweater, gray background

Lewis Trelawny-Cassity

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Lewis Trelawny-Cassity wearing brown sweater, gray background
Lewis Trelawny-Cassity

 

Associate Professor of Philosophy Lewis Trelawny-Cassity’s areas of teaching interest are the history of philosophy, political philosophy, and environmental ethics. As an undergraduate, Lew majored in English Literature and Environmental Policy at Warren Wilson College. After a few years of working in a plumbing warehouse in Kendall Square, Massachusetts and volunteering at Gould Farm, a community for adults with mental illness in Monterey, Massachusetts, Lew completed a Master’s Degree in Political Science at Boston College, where he was awarded a Bradley Fellowship. After Boston College, Lew went on to get his PhD at Binghamton University’s philosophy department, where he wrote his dissertation on Plato’s Laws.

At Antioch, Lew enjoys teaching classes, playing basketball and ping pong with community members, and serving on the Farm Committee and the Community Council. Currently, Lew is part of a three-year grant from the Great Lakes Colleges Association that seeks to develop undergraduate research in ancient philosophy through multi-campus student-faculty collaboration and yearly student conferences. Lew also teaches classes that combine philosophy with cooking and farming.

 

EDUCATION

  • M.A., Ph.D., Philosophy, Binghamton University
  • M.A., Political Science, Boston College
  • B.A., English Literature, Environmental Policy, Warren Wilson College

COURSES

  • GSC 210: Continued Studies in Global Seminar: On Eating, Cooking, and Thinking This course is intended to explore the nature of eating, cooking, and cuisine through a combination of experiential, practical, ethical, cultural, and philosophical approaches. Students in this course will: 1) develop their cooking skills to prepare them for co-op and life after graduation; 2) investigate eating through the practice of mindfulness; 3) investigate the ontological and philosophical aspects of eating; 4) reflect critically on the concepts of diet and cuisine; 5) study the ethics of the eating of animals; 6) explore the connections between eating and ecology; and 7) explore the social, cultural, and religious dimensions of eating with others.
  • PHIL 440: Selected Topics in Contemporary Philosophy: Heidegger’s Being and Time This iteration of PHIL 440 will be focused on a close reading of the Introduction and Division One of Heidegger’s Being and Time. Students are expected to read Being and Time carefully, with an aim to understanding the key terms, concepts, and overall structure of this challenging text.
  • PHIL 299: Independent Study: Aristotle’s Politics This independent study will be a seminar focused on a close reading of Aristotle’s Politics. Students are expected to read all of the Politics, investigate secondary sources, and actively participate in class discussions. This course is part of a Great Lakes Colleges Association collaborative undergraduate teaching and research project. As part of this course, students are expected to present or comment on a paper at a conference held at Antioch College. This course will meet for approximately 22.5 hours during the quarter, not including the mandatory conference at Antioch or the optional conference at Earlham. In order to meet the credit requirement for this course and to fulfill its learning objectives, students are expected to spend at least 45 hours outside of class on the Politics.

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

 

Selected Articles

  • “On the Foundation of Theology in Plato’s Laws,” Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy, Vol. 18, No. 2 (Spring 2014).
  • “tēn tou aristou doxan  On the Theory and Practice of Punishment in Plato's Laws,” Polis: The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought, Vol. 27, No. 2 (2010).

Selected Presentations

  • “On Eating, Thinking, and Cooking,” with Isaac DeLamatre, 2016 Food Systems Workshop: Teaching About Food Systems: Creating a Community of Practice,” Columbia University, Institute of Human Nutrition, New York, 27 July 2016.
  • “Remarks on Laws 623e3-4 and its Context,” Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy, New York, 24 October 2015.
  •  “Comments on Kevin Miles’ “Animal Allegory and the Politics of Zeus in Hesiod’s Theogony,” GLCA Ancient Philosophy Workshop, Wabash College, 24 September 2015.
  • “Uncovering the Athenian Stranger’s Debts to Tyrtaeus and Theognis,” Society for Greek Political Thought Panel, American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, 9 September 2015.

Antioch’s curriculum is inherently interdisciplinary, and students work with faculty in all divisions prior to earning a bachelor’s degree. Here is a list of all teaching faculty at the College. 

Catalina Jordan Alvarez

Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Arts

Catalina Jordan Alvarez

Catalina Jordan Alvarez grew up in rural Tennessee with a Colombian mother and an American father. Her narratives explore the cultural and composed movements of bodies across social and geographical boundaries. Her films have screened at festivals including New Orleans, Los Angeles, Slamdance, Fantastic Fest, Edinburgh Short, Oxford, and Palm Springs. She is a recipient of fellowships and residencies from the Flaherty Seminar, the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, Flux Factory and the Wexner Center for the Arts.

Alvarez approaches teaching as another facet of her art practice. In her intermediate video production intensive, students conduct documentary research in order to shoot their own fictional narrative. This approach connects the class with members of the community and grounds their fictions in historical specificity. Her fall 2018 class studied the Antioch Program for Interracial Education (1964-1969) and later produced a film about a group of female black students who created systemic change at Antioch by lobbying for the creation of the Afro-American Studies Institute. In her course, “Choreographed Films and Experimental Musicals,” students study the history of the musical alongside formal experimentation in contemporary art as inspiration for their weekly assignments. Her syllabus functions as a script with room for interpretation—she asks students to use techniques she is currently developing, and they adapt these to their own creative visions. Alvarez also teaches solid technical grounding: cinematography and composition, shutter speeds and apertures, as well as fundamentals of recording and mixing sound. Students review the rules of continuity editing and use Adobe Premiere Pro to edit, create titles, and color grade. In her senior projects course, students learn to operate specialized equipment and subsequently integrate these tools in their own projects.

 

EDUCATION

  • 2017 MFA, Film and Media Arts, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • 2011 Certificate, Directing, filmArche, e.V., Berlin, Germany
  • 2005 BFA, Experimental Theatre & Spanish Literature, NYU Tisch School of the Arts, New York, NY

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

Beth Bridgeman

Beth Bridgeman

Assistant Professor of Cooperative Education

Beth Bridgeman
Beth Bridgeman

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Beth teaches a series of Reskilling and Resilience courses, exploring seed-resilience, plant medicine, regenerative agriculture and commensality.  

She leads cooperative education partnerships in sustainability, environmental science, biomedical science, and alternative education, and is co-op liaison to the science division and to the Japanese language and culture program. A recipient of a faculty excellence award from the Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education, she has also received GLCA OHLA funding for her project “Re-establishing a Seed Commons through Oral History Methodology”. Accepted presentations in 2019 include: the Society for Ethnobiology, the Association for the Study of Food & Society, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, the Environmental Education Council of Ohio, the Ohio Ecological Food and Farm Association, the Ohio State University, and School of the Alternative.  

EDUCATION

Master of International Administration, SIT Graduate Institute

BA, Elementary Education, University of Northern Colorado

AWARDS

Southwestern Ohio Council for Higher Education Faculty Excellence in Service Award.

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES
SELECTED PRESENTATIONS

Food, Forage, Farm, Feast: Teaching Reskilling, Sustainability and Commensality at Antioch College- AASHE, 2019

The Antioch Apothecary: Place-Based Experiential Learning: Society for Ethnobiology, 2019

The Outdoor Apothecary: Teas and Tinctures, Syrups and Salves, Environmental Education Council of Ohio, 2019

Seed Sovereignty: How to Save Seed and Why You Should: OEFFA, 2019

Seed Saving and Seed Law, CFAES Day of Education, The Ohio State University, 2019

Seed Law, Community Solutions, 2018

History of Seed Patent Law in the United States Since 1930, InFACT Seed to Sustainability, Antioch College, 2017

Community Efforts and Environmentalism, Chatham College Food and Climate Change conference, 2017

Seed-saving: Teaching Methods for School Gardening, OSU Extension Annual School Gardening Conference, 2017

Communities of Sustainable Practice: Seed-saving as Resilience, F.O.C.U.S. Minority, Women and Small Farmers conference, Central State University, 2016.  

A Higher Education Perspective on Outdoor Education, Environmental Education Council of Ohio Annual Conference, 2016

COURSES

The Antioch Harvest: Seed-saving, Canning, Fermenting, and Preserving

Reskilling, Sustainability and Community

The Antioch Apothecary: Teas and Tinctures, Syrups and Salves

Seed Sovereignty and Citizen Action.  

Resilience in the Anthropocene.

Food, Farming and Resilience: Integrative Learning on the Antioch Farm

Cooperative Education 145, 245, 345, 390,  445

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Brooke Bryan wearing black with necklace, outdoor background

Brooke Bryan

Chair of the Writing Program and Assistant Professor of Writing and Digital Literacy

Brooke Bryan wearing black with necklace, outdoor background
Brooke Bryan

 

Brooke Bryan is Chair of the Writing Program and Assistant Professor of Writing and Digital Literacy at Antioch College where she specializes in phenomenological oral history and undergraduate research frameworks.

Supported by the Great Lakes Colleges Association, Brooke directs Oral History in the Liberal Arts—a three-year initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that supports undergraduate oral history research by providing open source workflows and technology stacks for tools in the digital humanities, and articulating pedagogical strategies for ‘high stakes’ teaching and learning through faculty-mentored oral history projects across 13 institutions.

 

EDUCATION

  • M.A., Oral History Methodology, Antioch University, 2013
  • B.A., Classics, Antioch University, 2009

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

  • Supported by GLCA, led a team of scholars and librarians exploring undergraduate research paradigms at ILiADS at Hamilton College's Digital Humanities Initiative; included funding for one student who was able to present on a panel, becoming a founding member of the Undergraduate Research Network
  • Instructor at Ohio Humanities' residential Oral History Institute at Kenyon College
  • Supported by the Lloyd Family Fund at Antioch College, coached four students to present posters of their faculty-mentored research projects (conducted during WORK 425) exploring social justice themes at the 2015 Oral History Association meeting in Tampa Bay.
  • Led a workshop on digital tools for research at Oral History Association annual meeting, "Digging into Digital Platforms: One Interview/Four Tools"
  • Served on the Grant Review panel for the Ohio History Fund, awarding $100,000 to 14 projects across the state
  • Commissioned as an interviewer for Ohio History's Ohio Veterans Oral History project with the support of Ohio Humanities
  • Awarded $393,710 grant from the Great Lakes Colleges Association through the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The three-year project, Oral History in the Liberal Arts, connects oral history and digital storytelling methods with experiential learning and undergraduate research paradigms-- developing a consortial archive and providing pedagogical tutorials and open source technology stacks to faculty and librarians across all 13 GLCA schools. The project is designed to provide micro-grants to more than 50 faculty, instructional staff, and students across GLCA over three years.

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Cary Campbell wearing blue collar shirt

Cary Campbell

Assistant Professor of French Language and Culture

Cary Campbell wearing blue collar shirt
Cary Campbell

 

Instructor of French Dr. Cary Campbell comes to Antioch College most recently from the University of Pittsburgh where he served for two years as their Coordinator of French Language programs.  He also trained there both as a linguist and as a literary scholar.  From his undergraduate training both in Linguistics and French, he developed interests in language pedagogy, syntax, Romantic and Francophone narrative fiction.  They eventually culminated in his MA in literature and linguistics, and in his PhD in African literature with a dissertation focusing on the construction of national identity in recent novels from Côte d'Ivoire.  Today, he is broadening his dissertation topic into a book project comparing literary representations of national identity across a range of African Francophone countries.

While pursuing this education, Dr. Campbell kept a busy schedule teaching all levels of French, as well as courses in phonology, approaches to literature, the history of the French Atlantic, the African novel of French expression, and Anticolonialism.  His fifteen years of teaching experience has also included collaboration on several online French textbooks and interactive video-based French courses, earning him Contributing Author credits on Carnegie Mellon's award winning Open Learning Initiative French Online program.  Dr. Campbell has a long history of applying proficiency-based and communicative methods in the classroom and in infusing all his classes, from elementary French to advanced literature, with the cultural products, practices and perspectives he developed a love for during his overseas experiences in France and in Côte d'Ivoire.

 

EDUCATION

  • PhD French Language and Literature, University of Pittsburgh, 2010
  • PHD-level Cultural Studies Certificate, University of Pittsburgh, 2005
  • MA French Linguistics and Literature, University of Pittsburgh, 2002
  • BA French / BA Linguistics, Brigham Young University, 1999

COURSES

  • FRAN 110 Introductory French I
  • FRAN 210 Intermediate French I
  • FRAN 310 Advanced French I

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

  • "Veronique Tadjo’s Loin de mon père: Postcolonial National Identity and the Reification of Allegory": Cincinnati Conference in Romance Languages and Literatures – April 2014
  • "Subaltern Perspectives and National Liberation: Béti, Nganang, and the Literary Strategy of the Underdog": African Literature Association Conference – March 2013
  • "The Post-Ivoirité Kourouma: A Postcolonial Pro-national Prescience": Pennsylvania Foreign Language Conference – September 2012
  • "Re-reading Les Soleils in the light of Ivoirité: Kourouma as postcolonial nationalist": African Literature Association Conference – April 2012
  • "La Persistance de Nation: Boni, Tadjo et l’Ivoirité": African Literature Association Conference Panel – April 2011
  • "Nègres et nègres: Tanella Boni on French latent racism and neocolonial Côte d’Ivoire": Cincinnati Conference in Romance Languages and Literatures – May 2009
  • "The National Tug of Home: National Identity in the Parisian African Immigrant Community of Alain Mabanckou's Bleu Blanc Rouge": African Literature Association Conference Panel – March 2007
  • "Che vuoi, Piccolo Principe?: Slavoj Žižek's take on Lacanian Subjectivity in St. Éxupéry's Le Petit prince": Faculty/Graduate Departmental Seminar – November 2004
  • "How We Add Technology to the Mix": TA Panel for the Multimedia in Language Learning Workshop Series, Robert Henderson Language Media Center, University of Pittsburgh – September 2004
  • "Do They Get It? : A Study on Assessing Comprehension in Foreign Language Learners": Faculty/Graduate Departmental Seminar – March 2002

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • "The Persistence of Nation: Allegory and Ivoirité in Véronique Tadjo’s Novels": Women in French Studies – currently under consideration

Michael Casselli

Assistant Professor of Sculpture and Installation, Faculty Trustee

Michael Casselli

Michael Casselli has been interested in the hybridization of forms and media since he received his undergraduate degree in visual arts/performance theory from Antioch College in 1987. While at the college, he staged large-scale outdoor mixed media performance installations, whose primary focus was an attempt to clarify issues of sense-based perception and the physicality inherent in performative work. After Antioch, he was accepted into the Masters Program in Sculpture at Rhode Island School of Design (RISD).

While at RISD his worked started to move away from the performative context, while maintaining a vested interest in sense of physicality, choosing to focus on the role that the spectator plays as a necessary figurative element of a completed work. It was at RISD that he started to define the contextual framework through which his work was to be experienced. By eliminating physical boundaries between the viewer and the work, he provided the spectator with a choice as to how they would interact with it.

While these concerns still remain active in the work he produces today, his vocabulary has expanded to include more subtle ways of asking the same questions, and has allowed him to consider a broader palate of contemporary media in the creation of his work, utilizing video, robotics, and home-grown technologies. Michael spent twenty years in New York City within the underground art and performance scene, fully integrating his early concerns with performance and the visual arts. While continuing to create large-scale installations, he found himself able to apply many of the same concerns within the performance arena, creating scenic and video design for dance and theater, earning him a Bessie Award for Scenic Design in 1987. Michael relocated to Yellow Springs in 2009 to establish the Manic Design Studio, a place for hybrid experimentation in all media.

 

EDUCATION

  • MFA, Visual Arts, Rhode Island School of Design
    • Concentration: Sculpture
    • Thesis: Hybrid Form and the Question of Traditional Arts Practice
  • BA, Self-Designed Major, Antioch College
    • Concentration: Visual Arts/Performance Theory

COURSES

  • MEDA 101: Media, Internet, and Society
  • MEDA 130: Practical New Media
  • MEDA 160: Sound Art
  • MEDA 230: Reactive Systems

Didier Franco

Assistant Professor of Spanish Language/Culture

Didier Franco

Didier Franco, Instructor of Spanish, received his MA in Latin American Literatures and Cultures, Summa Cum Laude, from Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago. He has also received a Certificate of Achievement from the College of Graduate Studies and Research, at Northeastern Illinois University. Didier is a member of the SIGMA DELTA PI, National Honor Society in Spanish, The Association of College Honor Societies, and a member of the NACADA, National Academic Advising Association. Didier previously taught both Spanish and Literature at the City Colleges of Chicago. Didier has recently received a certificate from CARLA, The Center for Advanced Research and Language Acquisition, for completion of study in teaching language online. His future research interests include the exploration of various identities in United States Latino literature emphasizing their significance and role in past and modern American Intersectionalism.

 

EDUCATION

  • Master of Arts in Latin American Literatures and Cultures (Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, 2014)
  • Bachelors of Arts in Spanish (Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL, 2010)​

COURSES

  • SPAN 110: Introductory Spanish I Didier expresses his fondness for the Spanish 110 introductory course. This course is designed for students who are new to Spanish or for students with some basic background in the language but need to refresh their skills. The course stands out to Didier as one of his favorites as he enjoys the privilege to first introduce students to Spanish language and culture. SPAN 110 is based on a communicative approach to language learning thus the classroom is always full of new topics, discussions and students begin to incorporate the Spanish language in everyday communication.
  • SPAN 210: Intermediate Spanish I Spanish 210 is the first course in the intermediate level of Spanish and the continuation of Spanish 140. Spanish 210 is the first course that is not a requirement for the college but rather is comprised of students from the first year that choose to devote their time to further learning the Spanish language and possibly continue with the optional 3 year track. The classes are typically smaller than the first year and full of committed, enthusiastic students. As students move forward they are able to build deeper relationships with each other, their instructor and the Spanish language culture. These students are beginning to think more critically and express themselves more deeply in the Spanish language through topics related to their own lives and the global world. Areas of study may include but are not limited to: reading writing and speaking of the Spanish language, as well as culture, literature, film and poetry of the Spanish speaking world.
  • SPAN 320: Advance Spanish II Spanish 320 is a fun course as students are more deeply studying Latin American topics through literature and other authentic texts. Each week the course focuses on a different topic allowing students and the instructor to discuss and think critically about the themes presented. Areas of study may include but not be limited to: love, revolution, family, immigration, identity, social justice and other topics in Latin America. These topics are explored through Latin American film, theater, poetry, literature, articles, biographies and more.
David Kammler blue jacket tie

David Kammler

Dean of Academic Affairs and Associate Professor of Chemistry

David Kammler blue jacket tie
David Kammler

 

Dr. David Kammler is interested in a wide variety of activities, disciplines, and modes of inquiry, especially: astronomy and space exploration, biochemistry, chemistry, cooking, gardening, history, philosophy, running, soccer, and teaching.  Dr. Kammler began to focus on chemistry and biochemistry in college, and graduated from Harvard University in 1994 with an AB, Cum Laude, in Chemistry.  During this time Dr. Kammler fell in love with teaching and the interdisciplinary modes of inquiry found within liberal arts colleges.  After a short hiatus for rest, recovery, cooking, and more teaching, Dr. Kammler attended graduate school at Indiana University, Bloomington, and was awarded a Ph.D. in Chemistry (Organic Chemistry major, Biochemistry minor) in 2002.  Dr. Kammler came to Antioch College as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and then an Assistant Professor of Chemistry, where he remained until the school’s closure in 2008.  During this time, he taught majors classes in chemistry and biomedical science, as well as interdisciplinary general education classes such as the science of cooking, chemistry and art, and fresh water chemistry, all of which included healthy doses of history, philosophy, and hands-on learning.  From 2008-2011, Dr. Kammler was an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at Wilberforce University, where he taught majors classes in biomedical science and health services administration, as well as general education classes.  In 2011, Dr. David Kammler was privileged to join the new Antioch College, where he currently teaches chemistry and chemistry-related classes for the biomedical science and environmental science majors, as well as general education classes, with the expected sprinklings of art, astronomy, history, philosophy and, of course, humor.  In 2012, Dr. Kammler became the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, responsible for a wide variety of practical curricular mechanics, which increased when he became Dean of Academic Affairs in 2016.  According to sources that could just possibly be reliable, he continues to have a sense of humor, and still finds writing his own biographical sketches rather odd.  Dr. Kammler is a third-generation Eagle Scout, has written, received, and reviewed scientific grants and patents, has received three distinguished teaching awards since his teaching career began in 1992, and is most assuredly a foodie.

 

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., Organic Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington
  • A.B., Chemistry, Harvard University

COURSES

  • Chem 105/160: General Chemistry I/II + Lab
  • Chem 205/330: Organic Chemistry I/II + Lab
  • Chem 340: Biochemistry (now a two-course series, Chem 341/342)
  • GS 110: Global Seminar: Water
  • GS 160: Global Seminar: Education

AREAS OF INTEREST

  • Organic and Biological Chemistry
  • Chemistry of Art
  • Science of Cooking

RECOMMENDED LIGHT READING

  • The Chronicles of Master Li and Number Ten Ox (Bridge of Birds, Story of the Stone, Eight Skilled Gentlemen) by Barry Hughart
  • The Mars Trilogy (Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars) by Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Snow Crash by Neal Stephenson
  • The Diamond Age, or A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer, by Neal Stephenson
  • Buck Godot: Zap Gun For Hire by Phil Foglio
  • On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, 2nd Edition, by Harold McGee
  • Caveman Chemistry: 28 Projects, from the Creation of Fire to the Production of Plastics by Kevin M. Dunn

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • Woehrle, J., Kammler, D., & Spirrison, H. (2016). Minimally Invasive Assessment.  Intersection, The newsletter of the Association for the Assessment of Learning in Higher Education, Fall Edition, 12-15.
  • “Studies of Azetidin-2-one as a Reactive Enolate Synthon of β-Alanine for Condensations with Aldehydes and Ketones”, Williams, D. R.; Donnell, A. F.; Kammler, D. C.; Ward, S. A.; Taylor IV, L. J. Org. Chem. 2016, 10463-10475; published on the Web (ASAP Article) September 14, 2016 DOI: 10.1021/acs.joc.6b01585
  • “A Service-Learning Project in Chemistry: Environmental Monitoring of a Nature Preserve”, Kammler, D.; Truong, T.; VanNess, G.; McGowin, A. J. Chem. Educ201289, 1384-1389.  Featured on the cover of the November 2012 issue.  Published on the Web 9/4/12. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ed300109k
Brian Kot black jacket, gray background

Brian Kot

Assistant Professor of Biology and Environmental Science

Brian Kot black jacket, gray background
Brian Kot

 

Brian Kot is a comparative vertebrate zoologist with a dual background in applied engineering and biology. He often develops experimental research technology that involves design and fabrication assistance from motivated students. His research interests are multidisciplinary, with hypothesis-driven questions often involving foraging ecology, predator-prey interactions, locomotion performance (e.g., biomechanics and energetics), and sensory capabilities.

Professor Kot has conducted scientific investigations on a wide diversity of vertebrate taxa including baleen whales, seals, hammerhead sharks, whale sharks, marine turtles, seabirds, wolves, gray foxes, fishers, bobcats, prairie dogs, ringtails, white-tailed deer, moose, cactus mice, woodrats, and desert tortoises. Some of his recently developed research equipment includes near-infrared video systems that help test for statistically significant differences in food preferences among nocturnal rodents, and underwater remote sensing systems for use in field experiments involving fish and marine mammal sensory capabilities.  He and his work have been featured in the popular press, online (e.g., BBC – Earth News), and on international television programs (e.g., Discovery Channel’s Animal Planet program). In March 2017, his work was part of a blue whale exhibition (Out of the Depths: The Blue Whale Story) at the Royal Ontario Museum.

When not involved with teaching or research expeditions, Brian enjoys traveling, hiking, camping, fly fishing, snowshoeing, and restoring classic muscle cars and vintage snowmobiles.

 

EDUCATION

  • Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Minnesota Zoo/University of Minnesota - Duluth
  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Texas A&M University
  • Ph.D., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA)
  • M.A., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, UCLA
  • B.S., Packaging, Michigan State University

COURSES

  • BIO 160: Life: Organisms and Systems
  • BIO 240: Zoology
  • BIO 330: Anatomy and Physiology I
  • BIO 340: Evolutionary Biology
  • BIO 350: Natural History of the Vertebrates
  • ENVS 330: Conservation Biology
  • SCI 297: Independent Scientific Research
  • SCI 394: Junior Writing Seminar
  • SCI 494: Senior Writing Seminar
  • SCI 495: Senior Project

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

* denotes mentored or co-mentored undergraduate student

  • Pozzanghera, E.*, B.W. Kot., and J. Hill. Comparative passive range of motion of the canine hind limb: a clinical reference with applications in rehabilitation and physical therapy. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (in submission)
  • Marshall, C.D., K. Rozas*, B. Kot, and V. Gill. Innervation patterns of sea otter (Enhydra lutris) mystacial follicle-sinus complexes. 2014. Frontiers in Neuroanatomy. doi:10.3389/fnana.2014 .00121
  • Marshall, C.D., S. Wiettonkotten, W. Hanke, F. Hanke, A. Marsh*, B. Kot and G. Denhardt. 2014. Feeding kinematics, suction, and hydraulic jetting performance in harbor seals (Phoca vitulina). PLoS ONE 9:e86710. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0086710.
  • Kot, B.W., R. Sears, D. Zbinden, E. Borda and M.S. Gordon. 2014. Rorqual whale (Balaenopteridae) surface lunge-feeding behaviors: unified classification, repertoire diversity and evolutionary analyses. Marine Mammal Science 30:1335-1357. [cover article]
  • Kot, B.W., D. Zbinden and R. Sears. 2013. Aerial behavior by the fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus)  in the wake of a freighter and near other boats. Marine and Freshwater Behaviour and Physiology 46:267-272.
  • Kot, B.W., R. Sears, A. Anis, D.P. Nowacek, J. Gedamke and C.D. Marshall. 2012. Behavioral responses of minke whales (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) to experimental fishing gear in a coastal environment. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 413:13-20.
  • Kot, B.W., T. Morisaka, R. Sears, D. Samuelson and C.D. Marshall. 2012. Low prevalence of visual impairment in a coastal population of gray seals (Halichoerus grypus) in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. Aquatic Mammals 38:423-427.
  • Kot, B.W., C. Ramp, and R. Sears. 2009. Decreased feeding ability of a minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) with entanglement-like injuries. Marine Mammal Science 25:706-713.
  • Cooper, L.N., N. Sedano, S. Johansson, B. May, J. Brown, C.M. Holliday, B.W. Kot, and F.E. Fish. 2008. Hydrodynamic performance of the minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata) flipper. Journal of Experimental Biology 211:1859-1867.
Richard Kraince wearing gray suit with yellow tie

Richard Kraince

Dean of Cooperative, Experiential, and International Education and Associate Professor of Cooperative Education

Richard Kraince wearing gray suit with yellow tie
Richard Kraince

Richard Kraince is an associate professor of cooperative education as well as the Dean of Cooperative, Experiential, and International Education at Antioch College. He concentrates on the role of the university in social change both as a scholar and an educator. He conducts research on the relationships between social movements and educational reform internationally. He previously held posts as research professor of Southeast Asia studies and academic coordinator at El Colegio de México in Mexico City, where he taught graduate level courses on contemporary movements, social research methods, and the political sociology of Islam in Southeast Asia.

From 2003 to 2006, Dr. Kraince directed Ohio University’s Inter-Religious Dialogue Project. He previously served as a program officer with the Asia Foundation’s Islam and Civil Society program based in Jakarta. He conducted field research in Indonesia as a Foreign Language and Areas Studies grantee in 1998–99, a Fulbright Dissertation Research Program Fellow in 2000, and as a Fulbright New Century Scholar in 2005. He has also conducted educational research projects in Malaysia and southern Thailand. Richard has numerous years of experience leading experiential education programs in Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. He speaks English, Indonesian/Malay, and Spanish.

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D., Education, Ohio University
  • M.A., International Affairs—Southeast Asia Studies, Ohio University
  • M.A., Education, University of Rhode Island
  • B.S., Geology, Ohio University

COURSES

  • EXPR 145: Foundations of Community Action: Cooperative Education Preparation
  • COOP 345: Cooperative Education Field Experience II
  • COOP 390: Cooperative Education Field Experience III
  • COOP 490: Cooperative Education Field Experience Capstone

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • “Kraince, R. G. (2013). Revisitar el islam civil-democrático en los estados postautoritarios: lecciones del Movimiento Indonesia de Reforma. In El Fin de un Sueño Secular: Religión y Relaciones Internacionales en el Cambio de Siglo. Mexico City: El Colegio de México; pp. 129-153. ISBN: 978-607-462-424-3.
  • “Kraince, R. G. (2009). The Challenge to Religious Liberty in Indonesia. Washington DC: The Heritage Foundation; https://www.heritage.org/research/asiaandthepacific/bg2279.cfm
  • “Kraince, R. G. (2009). Reforming Islamic Education in Malaysia: Doctrine or Dialogue. In R. W. Hefner (ed.) Making Modern Muslims: The Politics of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia. Mānoa, Hawai'i: University of Hawai'i Press; pp. 106-140. ISBN: 978-0-8248-3280-3.
  • “Kraince, R. G. (Spring 2008) Academic Freedom in Muslim Societies. International Higher Education, 51. ISSN: 1084-0613.
  • “Kraince, R. G. (September 2007). Islamic Higher Education and Social Cohesion in Indonesia. Prospects: Quarterly Review of Comparative Education, 37 (3), pp. 345-356. ISSN: 0033-1538 (print); ISSN: 1573-9090 (electronic).
  • “Heyneman, S. P., Kraince, R. G., Lesko, N. & Bastedo, M. (2007). Higher Education and Social Cohesion: A Comparative Perspective. In Higher Education in the New Century: Global Challenges and Innovative Ideas. P. Altbach & P. M. Peterson (Eds.). Rotterdam, the Netherlands: Sense Publishers (in Conjunction with UNESCO). ISBN: 978-90-8790-199-8.
  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), Yadi, D. A. & Nugroho, S. (Directors) (2008). Conflict Management [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).
  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), & Sijabat, S. H. D. (Director) (2007). Interfaith Dialogue [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).
  • “Kraince, R. G. (Producer), Sustikarini, A. (Associate Producer), & Yadi, D. A. (Director) (2007). Peer Mediation: School, a Reflection of the Community [film]. Available from Ohio University Center for International Studies (English version) or University of Indonesia, Faculty of Social and Political Science, Center for Research on Inter-group Conflict and Conflict Resolution (Indonesian version).
Headshot of Kim Landsbergen

Kim Landsbergen

Associate Professor of Biology and Environmental Science

Headshot of Kim Landsbergen
Kim Landsbergen

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kimlandsbergen.com
Kim Landsbergen is an ecologist who uses physiological and biogeochemical methods to study carbon and water dynamics in terrestrial[caption id="attachment_15190" align="alignright" width="355"]Photo of Dr. Kim Landsbergen and students Antioch students Rian Lawrence ('17), Maya Canaztuj ('17), and Prof. Kim Landsbergen presented USEPA-funded P3 research at the National Science Fair in Washington D.C. April 2016.[/caption]systems, usually in the context of climate change, invasive plants, urban ecosystems, and land management. Prof. Landsbergen is a certified senior ecologist with the Ecological Society of America and owner of CarbonEcology Consulting. She has published more than 20 peer-reviewed ecology papers in scientific journals. She also holds an appointment as Visiting Research Scholar with Ohio State University’s Department of Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology. Kim joins the faculty most recently from the Columbus College of Art and Design, where she was an ‘embedded professor of science’. There she taught courses with themes in ecology, biomimicry, sustainable design, and infographics—the visual communication of scientific information. Previously, she taught at Ohio University in the Environmental and Plant Biology and Environmental Science programs. Community engaged practice from an ecological perspective can take many forms.
 
At Antioch College, Prof. Landsbergen is currently collaborating on applied ecology projects with students and staff at the Antioch Farm, atthe Glen Helen Nature Preserve, and in the Village of Yellow Springs. In addition, Kim is continuing to collaborate with artists to create sustainability-themed creative work. She is also interested in helping connect science with environmental policy issues and is active with state and national environmental non-governmental organizations. She is a STARS Technical Advisor with the Association for Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE), and serves on as an Associate Board Member on the Franklin County Soil Water Conservation District.
 

Collaborative / Student Projects on Antioch Farm, Campus, and Glen Helen Nature Preserve

 

Education

  • Postdoctoral Fellow, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
  • Ph.D., Forest Ecosystem Analysis, University of Washington, College of Forestry
  • M.S.,  Forestry and Environmental Studies, Duke University, School of the Environment
  • B.S., Chemistry and Biology (double major), University of Memphis

Scholarly Activities

Selected Publications

(Brown = maiden name for Kim Landsbergen. ‘*’ indicates student senior authorship of collaborative work with a undergraduate, graduate student or post-doc supervised by Dr. Landsbergen)

  • A. Ellison, C. LeRoy, K.J. Landsbergen, E. Bosanquet et.al., (2018) Art/Science Collaborations: New Explorations of Ecological Systems, Values, and their Feedbacks April 2018 in the Bulletin of the Ecological Society of Americahttps://doi.org/10.1002/bes2.1384
  • D. Lieurance * and K.J. Landsbergen(2016) Plant biomass allocation and growth analysis of the invasive shrub Amur honeysuckle in varying light habitats. Journal of the Torrey Botanical Society. 143(4):415-426.
  • J. Chiang * and K.J. Brown (2010) The effects of thinning and burning treatments on within-canopy variation of leaf traits in hardwood forests of southern Ohio. Forest Ecology and Management 260: 1065-1075
  • H. Joesting *, B.C. McCarthy, and K.J. Brown (2009) Determining the shade tolerance of American chestnut using morphological and physiological leaf parameters. Forest Ecology and Management 257: 280-286
  • R. Giuliani* and K.J. Brown (2008) Within-canopy sampling of global irradiance to describe downwelling light distribution and infer canopy stratification in a broadleaf forest. Tree Physiology 28(9):1407-19
  • J. Chiang *, L. Iverson, A. Prasad, and K.J. Brown (2008) Effects of changing climate and shifts in forest composition on forest ecosystem carbon balance. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology 50(11):1426-39
  • D. McCarthy* and K.J. Brown (2006) Soil respiration responses to topography, canopy cover, and prescribed burning in an oak-hickory forest in Southeastern Ohio. Forest Ecology and Management Vol. 237, pp. 94-102

Selected Presentations

  • AICAD conference: Science in the Studio - SanFrancisco CA - Oct 2015 Poster: Art (In Field Work), Science (in the Studio), and the Making of Antiochzine, https://www.exploringscienceinthestudio.cca.edu/#!antiochzine/t741o
  • Ecological Society of America, 100th Annual Meeting, Baltimore MD - Aug 2015. Workshop co-organizer: Breaking the Ice with STEAM: Synthesis, Innovation, and Improving Scientific Outreach through Artistic Collaboration, https://eco.confex.com/eco/2015/webprogram/Session10864.html
  • “Mining climate change science to create design solutions.” Pratt Sustainability Crash Course. Pratt Center for Sustainable Design Studies – New York NY. March 2013
  • “Design and science partnerships: Intersections of science literacy, service learning, and climate change communications.” 98th Annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Minneapolis MN. August 2013
  • “How do white oak trees respond structurally when their physical environment is changed by repeated fires?” 97th Annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America, Portland, OR. August 2012
  • “Innovation in the Greenhouse Gas Inventory Process: Lessons Learned from a Service-Learning Course at Ohio University.” Annual Meeting of the National Council for Science and the Environment. Washington D.C. January 2008

Courses

  • ENVS 105 Introduction to Environmental Science
  • ENVS 205 Ecology
  • BIO 210 Botany
  • ENVS 230 Soil: A Living System
  • ENVS 305 Ecology
  • ENVS 315 Hydrology
  • ENVS 339 Ecological Agriculture
  • SCI 494 Senior Seminar in the Sciences
  • SCI 495 Senior Project in Sciences
  • SCI 370 Special Tropics: Climate Change Biology (Winter 17)
  • CHEM 220 Environmental Chemistry (Fall 16)

 

Getting Into Grad School

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Scott Millen white shirt gray jacket

Scott Millen

Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Scott Millen white shirt gray jacket
Scott Millen

 

Dr. Scott Millen is a biochemist who specializes in the interface of pathogenic bacteria with the human immune system. He is also developing interests in using microorganisms for sustainable fuel production and carbon sequestration. Scott teaches courses in biology focusing on the cell and molecular level. In his free time, Scott enjoys spending time with his family, home brewing, fixing things, and developing his property for permaculture. Prior to joining Antioch College, Scott was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Miami University in Oxford, OH, where he taught microbiology and infectious disease courses.

 

EDUCATION

  • Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry & Microbiology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
  • B.Sc. in Biological Sciences, University of Cincinnati McMicken College of Arts & Sciences, Cincinnati, OH

COURSES

  • BIO 105 Life: Cells and Molecules
  • BIO 205 Genetics
  • BIO 215 Cell and Molecular Biology
  • BIO 230 General Microbiology
  • CHEM 341 Biochemistry I: Structure and Function of Biological Molecules
  • CHEM 342 Biochemistry II: Intermediary Metabolism

SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

  • SH Millen, M Watanabe, E Komatsu, F Yamaguchi, Y Nagasawa, E Suzuki, H Monaco, and AA Weiss. Single nucleotide polymorphism of pertussis toxin subunit S2 (ptxB) affect protein function. PLOS ONE 10(9):e0137379 Sept 16 (2015).
  • TS Johnson, CE Terrell, SH Millen, JD Katz, DA Hildeman, and MB Jordan. Etoposide selectively ablates activated T cells to control the immunoregulatory disorder hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Journal of Immunology 192(1):89-91 (2014).
  • SH Millen, OD Schneider, WE Miller, JJ Monaco, and AA Weiss. Pertussis Toxin B-Pentamer Mediates Intercellular Transfer of Membrane Proteins and Lipids. PLOS ONE 8(9):e72885 Sept 3(2013).
  • OD Schneider, SH Millen, AA Weiss, and WE Miller. Mechanistic insight into pertussis toxin and lectin signaling using T-cells engineered to express a CD8α/CD3ζ chimeric receptor. Biochemistry 51(20):4126-37 (2012).
  • SH Millen, DM Lewallen, AB Herr, SS Iyer, and AA Weiss. Identification and characterization of the carbohydrate ligands recognized by pertussis toxin via a glycan microarray and surface plasmon resonance. Biochemistry. 49(28):5954-67 (2010).
  • SH Millen, DI Bernstein, B Connelly, JI Ward, SJ Chang, and AA Weiss. Antibody-mediated Neutralization of Pertussis Toxin-induced Mitogenicity of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells. Infection and Immunology 72(1):615-20 (2004).
  • AA Weiss, AK Patton, SH Millen, SJ Chang, JI Ward, and DI Bernstein.   Acellular Pertussis Vaccines and Complement Killing of Bordetella pertussis. Infection and Immunology 72(12):7346-51 (2004).
Toyoko Miwa-Osborne

Toyoko Miwa-Osborne

Instructor of Japanese

Toyoko Miwa-Osborne
Toyoko Miwa-Osborne

 

Toyoko was born in Nagoya, Japan. She majored in English at Aoyama Gakuin University, which is located in the Shibuya/Harajuku section of Tokyo. After teaching English at a public junior high school in her hometown, she moved to Washington, D.C. to study TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages), a part of Applied Linguistics at American University and received a Master of Arts there. After graduation, she had an opportunity to teach Japanese at a college level and found that it was more rewarding than teaching English in Japan.

The institutions include American University, John’s Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Monterey Institute of International Studies (MIIS), University of Hawaii at Manoa, UCLA, Miami University at Oxford, OH, and Wright State University, Dayton, OH.

She has resided in Yellow Springs, OH, for over 20 years.

Different languages and cultures have always fascinated Toyoko. She realized as a child that people speak different languages and live differently, she is always curious about their languages, cultures and views. She has traveled to many countries and appreciates the diversity of their lives.

 

EDUCATION

  • MA, Applied Linguistics, American University, Washington, D.C. - Specialized in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
  • BA, English, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan

COURSES

  • JAPN 110 – 140: Introductory Japanese I - IV
  • JAPN 210 – 240: Intermediate Japanese I - IV
  • JAPN 310 – 340: Advanced Japanese I - IV
Amy Osborne wearing yellow with scarf, white brick background

Amy Osborne

Visiting Assistant Professor of Mathematics

Amy Osborne wearing yellow with scarf, white brick background
Amy Osborne

 

Prior to joining Antioch College Amy Osborne was the director for the Institute for Learning Differences at Thomas More College. She has also held appointments at the University of Cincinnati, Southern New Hampshire University, and Pikeville College. Amy has had a variety of teaching experiences working with college students in the areas of mathematics, statistics, and quantitative research methods for the education and social sciences. Presently pursing a PhD in Psychology, she is interested in cognitive and affective variables and their relationship to learning, particularly college mathematics. Additionally, she has used her passion for teaching to teach students of all ages interested in areas such as glass-blowing and the ecology of pollinators, such as honey bees. At present she in completing a grant cycle to fund Pollination Stations in and around the south-central Ohio region. When not teaching she can be found spending time with her family, cooking, and working in the apiary.

 

EDUCATION

  • 2012-Present Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, AZ
    • Pursuing PhD in Psychology-Cognition & Learning
  • 2003-2008 University Of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
    • Graduate courses in Education, Mathematics, and Art
  • 1994-1996 Eastern Kentucky University
  • 1999-2000 Richmond, KY
    • MS Mathematics (emphasis in Statistics)
  • 1997-1999 Morehead State University
  • 2001-2002 Morehead, KY
    • Graduate courses in Education and Art
  • 1992-1994 Morehead State University, Morehead, KY
  • BS Mathematics, Physics
  • 1990-1992 Ashland Community College, Ashland, KY

SCHOLARLY ACTIVITIES

Luisa Bieri Rios

Luisa Bieri Rios

Assistant Professor of Cooperative Education

Luisa Bieri Rios
Luisa Bieri Rios

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Luisa joined Antioch’s Cooperative Education faculty in 2015, and has a background in performance, women’s and gender studies, international education, and community engagement through the arts. Luisa has designed new co-op coursework engaging art as social practice, community action research, and place-based learning. Her primary focus areas within co-op include the arts and therapeutic practices as well as opportunities in Latin America. In Argentina, Luisa has developed co-op partnerships with organizations engaged in community action and social change, including: Mujeres de Artes Tomar, a feminist performance activist troupe; Fundación Hampatu, engaged in arts, sustainability and skills-based classes; and Club de Reparadores, a "repair club" that recycles and repairs items for reuse.

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Luisa's work as a writer, director and performer explores intersections of human rights, feminist thought, counter-memory, migration, ritual, and place-making. As an Open Society Institute Baltimore Community Fellow with Creative Alliance, Luisa developed an award-winning community arts program in southeast Baltimore. A member of Sol Rising healing arts troupe, Luisa was a founding member of Baltimore’s Theater Action Group and trained at The Theater of the Oppressed Laboratory with Agosto and Julian Boal, among others. As a teaching artist, Luisa aspires towards embodied, experiential and liberatory pedagogies and practices.

 

EDUCATION

  • M.A., Comparative Women’s Studies, Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • B.A., Latin American Literature, Theater, Smith College

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Louise Smith wearing black, outdoor background

Louise Smith

Associate Professor of Performance

Louise Smith wearing black, outdoor background
Louise Smith

Louise Smith ’77 is an alumna of Antioch College. She is a writer, performer,  educator and therapist. She worked for eleven years in Ping Chong and Company, touring nationally and internationally with collaborative productions that incorporated media and movement. She also appeared in works by artists Meredith Monk, Julie Taymor, and Ann Bogart. Her solo works have been seen at P.S. 122, Dixon Place, Dance Theater Workshop and La Mama in NYC, as well as the Illusion Theater in Minneapolis. Milwaukee’s Theater X,  and Actor’s Theater Louisville. Since 1984, she’s written and performed sixteen solo pieces.  She is the recipient of a Jerome Fellowship in Playwriting from the Playwright’s Center in Minneapolis,  a Bessie Award for her work with Ping Chong and an Obie for Painted Snake in a Painted Chair by The Talking Band. Smith was also awarded an NEA Collaborative Fellowship for Interfacing Joan, her solo with Ping Chong. In 2016 she had a writing residency at the Vermont Studio Center and was granted an Ohio Arts Council Artist’s Excellence Awards in playwriting, her second from the OAC. She’s written five plays for Yellow Springs Kids Playhouse, and in 2017 created a new work with Talking Band/Ellen Maddow entitled Fat Skirt and Big Nozzle, based on the paintings of James Ensor. She holds an IMA from Antioch University in Playwriting and an M.S.Ed from University of Dayton in Community Counseling.

 

EDUCATION

  • M.S.Ed., Community Counseling (with Licensure), University of Dayton
  • I.M.A., Playwriting, Antioch University
  • B.A., Theater, Antioch College

 

COURSES

  • PERF 103: Voice and Speech
  • PERF 250: Rehearsal and Production